Castle Pines North Metro District ballot issue on water fails

District's request for $49 million debt would have funded renewable water plan

Posted 5/10/18

Residents of the Castle Pines North Metropolitan District voted down a ballot measure May 8 that would have authorized the metro district to take on $49 million in debt, with a repayment cost of $103 …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

E-mail
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you made a voluntary contribution of $25 or more in Nov. 2018-2019, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access Includes access to all websites


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.

Castle Pines North Metro District ballot issue on water fails

District's request for $49 million debt would have funded renewable water plan

Posted

Residents of the Castle Pines North Metropolitan District voted down a ballot measure May 8 that would have authorized the metro district to take on $49 million in debt, with a repayment cost of $103 million, aimed at funding its renewable-water plan.

The special district established in 1984 provides water, wastewater and stormwater services and oversees 352 acres of open space. The district serves more than 3,200 residential and business customers, according to the CPNMD website.

The debt was intended to financially support the district's renewable water plan. Previous board of directors have set a goal of achieving 50 percent renewable water and in February directors approved asking voters for the $49 million.

Unofficial results available May 8 showed 2,434 votes of no and 1,017 votes of yes on the issue.

The district would have used the money to participate in the expansion of a water treatment plant at Centennial Water and Sanitation District in Highlands Ranch and support constructing storage facilities to capture agriculture water rights the district owns.

The debt would have been paid for in part through property taxes by raising the district's mill levy to an annual maximum of 11.45 mills.

Voters also elected four new board directors May 8, said District Manager Jim Nikkel, so it's unclear what the plan will be moving forward until the new directors are able to address the renewable-water plan.

“Our long-term goal was to get to 50 percent renewable,” Nikkel said. “I don't know what the plan is today.”

Comments

Our Papers

Ad blocker detected

We have noticed you are using an ad blocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we receive from our advertisers helps make this site possible. We request you whitelist our site.