eclipse

Castle Rock turns eyes to the sun for eclipse

Spectators share eclipse glasses amid shortages

Posted 8/21/17

Solar eclipse spectators gathered in a courtyard at the Outlets at Castle Rock on Aug. 21 for a community viewing party, and although eclipse glasses were scarce, those who did score the required spectacles shared with those who had not been able …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

E-mail
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you’re a print subscriber or made a voluntary contribution in Nov. 2016-2017, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access Includes access to all websites


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.
eclipse

Castle Rock turns eyes to the sun for eclipse

Spectators share eclipse glasses amid shortages

Posted

Solar eclipse spectators gathered in a courtyard at the Outlets at Castle Rock on Aug. 21 for a community viewing party, and although eclipse glasses were scarce, those who did score the required spectacles shared with those who had not been able to.

“I wish there were more glasses available,” Luke Nelson of Castle Rock said, as he and family discussed which locations in town had offered and then sold out of eclipse glasses.

Nelson attended with his mother, Ann, along with Donna Orr, also of Castle Rock. The trio was able to get glasses through family, they said, but were happy to give those without a chance to use theirs.

Not far away from where the Nelsons stood was Michele Andersen picnicking with Alani Andersen, 10, and Kiana Andersen, 4. The Andersens traveled from Highlands Ranch to watch the eclipse, and were among those who weren't able to acquire glasses.

“It's OK, this is still cool,” Michele said. “People have actually been really nice letting us borrow their glasses.”

One of those generous event goers was Susan Milhollan, who had taken her daughter, Samantha, out of school for a few hours so the two could watch the eclipse together. The mother-daughter duo took turns using glasses they'd received through her husband's work, Milhollan said, but also made sure to let people without glasses take a turn watching the eclipse.

As people across the event passed glasses among one another, Ann Nelson said she enjoyed seeing unity among the community.

“This is bringing everyone together,” Ann Nelson said. “I thought that was pretty cool.”

Comments

No comments on this story | Please log in to comment by clicking here
Please log in or register to add your comment