Fun with paper fireworks all summer

Posted 6/30/17

Young children are often afraid of loud startling fireworks, but there are alternative ways children can have fun with fireworks on paper. This quiet activity often helps families during hectic family gatherings when children need a calming …

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Fun with paper fireworks all summer

Posted

Young children are often afraid of loud startling fireworks, but there are alternative ways children can have fun with fireworks on paper. This quiet activity often helps families during hectic family gatherings when children need a calming activity.

You’ll need paper, water color or poster paints, brushes, water, flat plates for water, and straws.

Dip a paintbrush in water and one primary color of red, yellow, or blue. If you are using poster paint, water it down. If you are don’t have paint, check out your refrigerator and cupboards for colorful juice, ketchup, mustard, pickle juice, and other colorful liquids. Mix with water to make them the consistency of water colors. You can take pictures of this perishable fragrant food art when complete.

Place a very large watery drop of one primary color on the paper. The drop must be raised and not allowed to soak into the paper. Then quickly place a drop of another primary color a quarter inch away.

Blow the one color toward the other with a straw. One giant burst of air creates a splat. Blowing from the side with the head near the table creates a different effect. Keep blowing the paint as it divides into branches of color that mix together until they won’t spread. Cover the whole page with explosions of colors.

Discuss how the colors mix. Red and blue make purple. Red and yellow make orange.

Think of the sounds fireworks make like pow, bang, crack, sizzle, ka-boom, and ka-pow. You can print the sound words (onomatopoeia) on the paper.

Have a conversation while creating. Why do you think we use fireworks and have parades during the summer? Why is this time like a big birthday party for the United States? Discuss why Americans celebrate. Depending upon your children’s ages, you can discuss 1776, the Revolutionary War, and the desire to be free from England.

If there is time, children can write a few sentences paraphrasing what you told them about the holiday or about what the family is doing to celebrate. If they cannot print, they can dictate a story while you print it correctly. Then they can read the story to the family. Young writers need practice reading or at least describing their pictures to an audience and being acknowledged.

This summer you can visit the library together and check out books about colors, parades, celebrations, famous people, and history. Ask your librarian for suggestions. While there, check out the summer reading program.

In school children often combine art and stories about experiences. Continuing this during the summer keeps their skills fresh and adds knowledge.

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