Highway Robbery

Posted 5/4/18

CDOT's proposal to expand I-25 along the 'Gap' using toll lanes sounds a lot like another road project in Colorado where we taxpayers provided the funding for the road expansion, but did not get the …

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Highway Robbery

Posted

CDOT's proposal to expand I-25 along the 'Gap' using toll lanes sounds a lot like another road project in Colorado where we taxpayers provided the funding for the road expansion, but did not get the right to use the additional lane unless we were willing to pay more to CDOT in the form of a toll.  That other project was the toll lane added on I-70 between Idaho Springs and the Berthoud Pass exit.  

In the 'Gap' project the entire $350 million cost is being covered by the revenue generated from our tax payments.  As taxpayers we contribute an incredible amount of money for road projects through state and federal gasoline taxes, auto registration taxes, etc.  In the case of the 'Gap" project we taxpayers have already paid for the project, yet CDOT feels they can use our tax revenue to fund the entire project, and then still charge us more to use the additional lanes.  Some people call this double taxation; I prefer to call it highway robbery.

If the CDOT funding model were used by our fire departments and police departments (which we again pay for entirely through our taxes), the police or fire departments would only respond to your home if you agreed to be standing in your front yard with a "toll" payment.  That payment would be required in order for them to provide any assistance. 

In summary, if we have paid for the lane expansion through our taxes, the lanes should be general purpose lanes.  

Jim Kullas,

Lone Tree

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