In Their Business

Posted 4/28/18

White Construction names new president Chris Haugen, a 21-year veteran of White Construction Group, based in Castle Rock, has been promoted to president of the firm. Haugen joined the firm in 1997 as …

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In Their Business

Posted

White Construction names new president

Chris Haugen, a 21-year veteran of White Construction Group, based in Castle Rock, has been promoted to president of the firm. Haugen joined the firm in 1997 as a carpenter looking for short-term employment, and after 21 years, has held a variety of positions including carpenter, project manager, estimator, senior estimator and, most recently, vice president of business development.

Tim White, founder and former president, and Doug Decker, 28-year veteran and former vice president, will transition out of daily operations and into board-level positions of chairman and vice chairman of the board, respectively. 

JR Keller, another longtime fixture at White, will be promoted to vice president of Operations. Keller joined the company in 2003 and has served as project manager, estimator, senior estimator and operations manager.

Bill Thomas, the new vice president of finance, came to White in 2017 from Duro Electric where he worked as controller for the past seven years.

“There's a time when you just need to let the next generation take over what you've started,” Tim White said in a news release. “We're not naïve to the fact that we're in a fast-changing time and that requires a lot of talent and energy. We're very fortunate as an organization to have those people on board.”

Artful design work honored

Designs By Sundown was recently named a finalist in the ELITE Award category by Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado. The company was honored for its work on a local ranch and home.

Designs By Sundown, based in Littleton, planned a landscape that blended elements of city and country, modernity with Old World Morocco, and design with nature, according to a news release from Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado. Designs By Sundown also revegetated a steep hillside to craft a landscape that would drain properly and merge with the surrounding open space.

The ELITE Award-winning projects reflect the 21st century values of sustainability, service and environmental stewardship, the release said. The award illustrates how Colorado's landscape companies deliver innovation, best management practices, originality, professionalism and problem solving, ALCC Executive Director John McMahon said in the release.

“These awards celebrate the connections between companies and clients to create and maintain landscapes that support Colorado's outdoor lifestyles,” McMahon said.

To view photos of ELITE projects and get ideas, go to www.alcc.com/elite-2018.

Solar carport unveiled in Centennial

A new solar carport unveiled April 25 at the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services office in Centennial is expected to offset more than 12,700 tons of carbon dioxide emissions in the next two decades, said a news release from SunPower, which designed and engineered the carport.

The solar carport is the second such carport in Centennial, which enjoys more than 250 days of sunshine each year. It includes more than 540 high-efficiency SunPower solar panels that are expected to produce more than 400,950 kilowatt hours of energy during the first year, and 11.6 million kWh over its projected 30-year lifespan.

“This solar carport is another example of Colorado's leading role in clean energy technology," Gov. John Hickenlooper said in the release. “It's projects like these, and so many others around the state, that will help us achieve our climate goals.” 

The project also includes the installation of high-efficiency LED lighting to further reduce the annual energy use load by 79,000 kWh. This will allow the solar project to produce 85 percent of the building's energy needs, all from a clean renewable source. 

The solar carport system was installed as a result of a public-private partnership between Centennial Sunrise Harvest, LLC, the U.S. General Services Administration, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, the City of Centennial, Independent Power Systems and SunPower Corp.

The economics that made this project possible were provided by private investment capital from Centennial Sunrise Harvest, LLC, renewable energy credits from Xcel Energy and federal tax credits.

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