Letter to the editor

Posted 10/2/18

Vote no on bond, mill levy There are several state and local ballot initiatives, all of which deserve our no vote. Most increase taxes, with the exception of proposition 112 that effectively bans oil …

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Letter to the editor

Posted

Vote no on bond, mill levy

There are several state and local ballot initiatives, all of which deserve our no vote. Most increase taxes, with the exception of proposition 112 that effectively bans oil and gas development to the extent that both gubernatorial candidates Stapleton and Polis oppose it, perhaps the only thing they both agree. 

Especially important for us in Douglas County is opposing the school board ballot initiatives for a bond and a mill levy tax increase.

The Sept. 28 article “Charter schools have a role in the DCSD tax conversation” by Alex Dewind states that lack of funding has caused disparities in teacher pay across county lines, but fails to point out that Cherry Creek and Littleton schools districts respectively have the second and third highest paid teachers in the state, second only, of course, to Boulder.

Teacher pay in Douglas County is a solid average and good enough to keep the so called dedicated teachers we want. Our statewide ranking for teacher pay should not be the issue.

Last spring, the DCSD Planning and Construction department collaborated with charter schools to assess capital needs, but admittedly the staff does not manage charter school maintenance so we can’t have much confidence in their estimate.

With 20 percent of the students the ballot initiative provides up to only $ 9 million out of the $250 million bond, or about 3.6 percent. Charters such as Highlands Ranch STEM occupies an older commercial building so they may need to tap into state per pupil revenue for facility needs — not fair.

Smith Young

Parker

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