Highlands Ranch

Mother, son die in Highlands Ranch murder-suicide

Woman owned business in Littleton

Chris Rotar
Posted 1/31/14

Motorists slowly passed the home on Fox Hunt Circle in Highlands Ranch, shaking their heads, or in the case of one passenger, cupping her mouth in apparent disbelief or shock.

On the bitterly cold morning of Feb. 1, crime-scene tape and law enforcement vehicles were evidence of the suburb-shaking events of the night before.

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

E-mail
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you made a voluntary contribution of $25 or more in Nov. 2017-2018, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access Includes access to all websites


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.
Highlands Ranch

Mother, son die in Highlands Ranch murder-suicide

Woman owned business in Littleton

Posted

Motorists slowly passed the home on Fox Hunt Circle in Highlands Ranch, shaking their heads, or in the case of one passenger, cupping her mouth in apparent disbelief or shock.

On the bitterly cold morning of Feb. 1, crime-scene tape and law enforcement vehicles were evidence of the suburb-shaking events of the night before.

A teenager had killed his mother, then himself.

Tatiana Klamo, 46, died from multiple gunshot wounds, according to the Douglas County Coroner's Office. Her son, Robert Klamo, a 15-year-old Mountain Vista High School student, died from a single, self-inflicted gunshot wound.

As investigators removed items from the home the morning after the shooting, a pair of second-floor windows remained open. Those were the routes a woman and a teenaged girl, the shooter's sisters, used to escape the deadly situation, authorities said.

The older sister was seriously injured as she fled. She remained in a local hospital as of Feb. 1, Douglas County Undersheriff Tony Spurlock said.

The mother

Tatiana Klamo ran a small business, American Stitch Factory, in Littleton. Her business partner, Brian McCoy, said she was "just amazing."

"She was the only truly honest person I've ever met," McCoy said Feb. 1, fighting back tears while standing just yards from Klamo's home.

American Stitch, located near the intersection of Broadway and Mineral, remained closed the morning of Feb. 3. A memorial of flowers and a candle had begun outside the shop's entrance. A note on the door told of Klamo's death and said a fund would soon be set up to help her surviving children.

"She was a nice lady, always worked very hard," said Lisa Jung, owner of Highland Shoe Repair, a shop next door to American Stitch.

Jung said Klamo, whose husband died years ago, was taking college classes in addition to her work at the store.

"She wanted a better life."

The son

Robert Klamo was a troubled young man, McCoy said. He believes the teen's troubles cost Tatiana Klamo her life after the two had an argument the night of Jan. 31.

"This stems from a problem with her son having mental illness," he said. "She was trying to get him help."

At Mountain Vista High School in Highlands Ranch, officials were poised to provide support for Klamo's classmates.

A statement from Mountain Vista Principal Michael Weaver was posted on the school's website Feb. 1.

The statement, in part, said:

"I am deeply saddened to inform you that Robert Klamo, a sophomore at Mountain Vista High School, died over the weekend. ... The District Crisis Team is working with school counselors and mental health professionals to ensure that both students and staff will have support.

"Feelings can be especially overwhelming at a time like this. There is no one right way to express the sadness, grief, and confusion that students will feel when they encounter a tragedy. On the other hand, a student may not react outwardly at all. Students can be particularly vulnerable if this event reminds them about another loss or sadness in their own lives. ..."

A gun

Officials haven't said what type of firearm Robert Klamo used. On Feb. 1, Spurlock said it was too early to know how the gun had been obtained.

Spurlock worked out of a mobile command center, a large vehicle parked on a street thick with snow. It had been little more than 12 hours since the standoff with the gun-wielding teenager came to a conclusion.

At about 7:30 p.m. Jan. 31, the Douglas County Sheriff's Office and other area law enforcement agencies responded to the home after reports of gunfire. Deputies confirmed four people were inside the residence.

Neighbors were told to stay inside their houses.

The Douglas County Regional SWAT team entered the home later in the night and found the two dead individuals. A sheriff's office spokesman said "no law enforcement service weapons were discharged."

A neighbor who was walking his dog the morning of Feb. 1 said he heard a loud bang around 10 p.m. the previous night, likely just before the SWAT team entered Tatiana Klamo's home.

The same man, who asked not to be identified, said he saw the three younger residents of the home outside clearing snow off cars the morning of the shooting.

"Everybody was happy and fine."

Comments

Our Papers

Ad blocker detected

We have noticed you are using an ad blocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we receive from our advertisers helps make this site possible. We request you whitelist our site.