Castle Rock aims to accommodate cyclists

Balancing needs of riders with those of drivers is key

Posted 9/12/19

As the Town of Castle Rock grows, so too has interest in cycling, said Transportation Planning and Traffic Engineering Manager Ryan Germeroth. “I think it’s a good mode of transportation, and …

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Castle Rock aims to accommodate cyclists

Balancing needs of riders with those of drivers is key

Posted

As the Town of Castle Rock grows, so too has interest in cycling, said Transportation Planning and Traffic Engineering Manager Ryan Germeroth.

“I think it’s a good mode of transportation, and it’s relatively cheap to get a bike. It provides an alternative to having a car, so if you’re looking to make a relatively short trip or a trip within the town to get from point A to point B, cycling can be a really viable option,” he said.

With added interest, the town is looking to bolster accessibility and safety for cyclists, Germeroth said, while balancing their needs with motorists’.

There are 51 miles of bike lanes sprawling throughout Castle Rock to date. In the downtown core, Castle Rock is considering sprucing up alleyways so cyclists can utilize them over main roadways like Wilcox Street and “not be exposed to as much vehicle traffic.”

That was one strategy identified by the recently adopted Downtown Mobility Study. The town’s Transportation Master Plan also lays out strategies for creating cycling facilities.

MORE: Safety advocates seek to stop cyclist fatality trend

In other areas of town, Germeroth said, public works looks to add bike lanes as it conducts routine maintenance on roads. If there’s room, the town adds striping to create a new bike lane.

A recent example of this can be found at Butterfield Crossing Drive in The Meadows.

There, the town added buffered bike lanes but was still able to keep one lane of traffic in each direction. A buffer is approximately three to four feet of space between where a vehicle drives and a cyclist rides.

“Anytime we’re doing a pavement maintenance project we look to see if the cross-section of that road will allow striping of bike lanes with the level of vehicle access it’s had historically,” he said.

The town does not have any recorded cyclist fatalities within town limits looking back to 2005, according to a town spokeswoman. Still, Germeroth urged motorists to be vigilant in watching for cyclists and slow down.

He reminded cyclists to follow the rules of the road as well. Staff most commonly hear that, when cyclists exhibit bad behavior, it’s because they didn’t stop at signals or stop signs, although he thinks the majority of cyclists behave well.

“It’s important to remember that the traveling public also has a responsibility in the overall safety of the cycling network in town,” he said. “It’s really a shared responsibility.”

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