Children learn good fridge raiding

Esther Macalady
Posted 8/28/19

There are many more “R’s” kids need to learn besides the basic reading, writing and arithmetic. There is also how to raid the refrigerator. Nutritionists hope they will learn to whip up …

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Children learn good fridge raiding

Posted

There are many more “R’s” kids need to learn besides the basic reading, writing and arithmetic. There is also how to raid the refrigerator. Nutritionists hope they will learn to whip up nutritious after school snacks. These will help one feel satisfied and have leftovers for lunch the next day. Simple cooking also teaches math measurement and following directions.

Quick Trail Mixes

Measure a cup of each of the following ingredients and place them in a large zip-lock bag: raisins, mini pretzels, chocolate chips, granola, nuts, if OK, Cheerios, banana chips, other dried fruits and anything else in the cupboard that looks good. gently mix with a wooden spoon, being careful not to crush the ingredients.

Trail Mix Nut Butter Balls 

Measure two tablespoons honey four tablespoons  nut butter, two cups granola or oatmeal, about two tablespoons of milk. Mix with a wooden spoon, make into balls and chill.

Raw Fruit and veggies

Keep raw vegetables and fruits and a selected table knife. Children like carrots, green beans, or small slices of zucchini, broccoli florets, or a rolled up lettuce leaf they can dip in ranch dressing, cut up bananas, apples, berries, melon, and pineapple. 

Simple Kabobs

Making the food look fun to eat helps children choose nutritious food, according to nutritionists. Children under supervision if very young can cut up bananas place them with berries, grapes on a kabob stick if safe for their age. 

Then they can dip in vanilla or strawberry yogurt and take off the stick to avoid choking before they eat the delicious snack.

Flag Toast

Children can toast a piece of bread and spread a stripe of cream cheese, strawberry or raspberry jam, and blueberries. Once finished, fold it over to make a sandwich.

Banana Mash

Bananas are a staple. Children have difficulty peeling though.  Show them how gorillas peel bananas.  Instead of peeling from the stem, peel it from the opposite end by making a small cut on that end using the fingernail or table knife.

Mash one peeled banana, one teaspoon honey, one teaspoon nut butter, if desired on a flat plate. Use a table fork with supervision. Spread on a piece of fruit or toast.

Split Banana

You’ll need one peeled banana, strawberry or vanilla yogurt, nutritious cereal, sliced grapes, strawberries or other berries. Use a table knife to cut  peeled banana lengthwise. Spoon desired amount of yogurt over the banana and sprinkle cereal on top and add pieces of fruit. 

You can keep after school snack recipes next to the refrigerator and help children get in the habit of checking out the list when they are hungry. Children can go through the list before going grocery shopping with you.

Esther Macalady is a retired schoolteacher in Golden. For more see grandparentsteachtoo.blogspot.com and wnmufm.org/Learning Through the Seasons.

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