Consequences of vaping in DCSD

Alex DeWind
Posted 3/6/19

The Douglas County School District bans the possession or use of all forms of tobacco — including e-cigarettes — by students on school property and at district-sponsored activities. Signs with …

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Consequences of vaping in DCSD

Posted

The Douglas County School District bans the possession or use of all forms of tobacco — including e-cigarettes — by students on school property and at district-sponsored activities. Signs with consequences of a violation are to be displayed on all school district property.

When addressing student violations of the policy, the district prefers the route of restorative practices. The district promotes education on e-cigarettes and the health hazards. The district also provides lessons for staff and faculty to increase awareness of vaping.

If a school resource officer from the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office catches an underage student using an electronic vaping product, he or she will confiscate the device and may summon the student to court for violating Douglas County’s ordinance on underage tobacco use, according to Lt. Lori Bronner, who oversees the district’s school resource officers. Penalties could include a fine or community service.

Bronner said the sheriff’s office prefers to work with the school district to help a student quit rather than using punitive measures.

— Alex DeWind

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