Council removes landmark status from downtown building

Property owners hope to redesign storefront following end of restrictions

Posted 6/11/19

The Castle Rock Town Council gave final approval June 4 to removing the local landmark status of a building in the heart of downtown, making way for its owners to pursue changes to the building’s …

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Council removes landmark status from downtown building

Property owners hope to redesign storefront following end of restrictions

Posted

The Castle Rock Town Council gave final approval June 4 to removing the local landmark status of a building in the heart of downtown, making way for its owners to pursue changes to the building’s storefront.

The site in question is at 302-304 Wilcox St. The structure was originally two buildings that were connected in 1997. The older of the two buildings was built in 1939 and functioned as a creamery. The newer was built in 1951.

Sarah Miles and John Egbert, whose company Milestone Properties purchased the building in 2018, said they hope redesigning the building’s facade will shed what they referred to as a “stigma” left by the building’s previous occupant, the Castle Rock Bar and Grill.

Miles said the previous business was known for rowdy behavior from patrons. She and Egbert believe redesigning the building front will distance it from that reputation. The business partners intend to open a craft cocktail lounge in the space and have already begun interior renovations.

Any improvements to the building would need further approvals from the town’s planning commission and design review board. Miles and Egbert said they want the future design to resemble other buildings on the block more closely than the current façade.

The building today features a stucco finish and a mismatched roofline — one building has a level roofline and the other one has arches.

In 1973 a car crashed into the older building, destroying its façade and windows. It is not eligible for the state or national registry but received a local historic designation in 1995.

Some town councilmembers said they didn’t believe it should have been given that status in the first place and noted it does not match the look and feel of neighboring buildings in the historic downtown.

The only councilmember to vote against de-landmarking was Caryn Johnson.

Johnson said certain architectural elements, namely windows, may not be historic but are unique and add character to the downtown. She did not want to see the windows removed.

The proposal received vocal support from other councilmembers, neighboring businesses and the downtown business community.

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