Crystal Valley Ranch site plan approved by Castle Rock council

Thelma Grimes
tgrimes@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 10/12/21

In a 5-2 vote, the Castle Rock Town Council approved the site development plan for a 142-home residential neighborhood within the Crystal Valley Ranch Planned Development. During the Oct. 4 regular …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Username
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you made a voluntary contribution in 2020-2021, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access includes access to all websites and online content.


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.

Crystal Valley Ranch site plan approved by Castle Rock council

Posted

In a 5-2 vote, the Castle Rock Town Council approved the site development plan for a 142-home residential neighborhood within the Crystal Valley Ranch Planned Development.

During the Oct. 4 regular meeting, Director of Development Services Tara Vargish said the property in question is in the southwest section of Crystal Valley Ranch. The 116-acre property has gone through a lot of changes since the original development plan was approved in 1985, Vargish said.

Gregg Brown, of the Crystal Development Company LLC., said he became involved in updating the planned development in 1998. The process was slowed in 2007 when the recession hit, he said. Plans were picked up again in 2012.

In working to meet town standards, Brown said they listened to neighbor comments and worked to have larger lots sizes. Brown said lot sizes are on average going to be 90 feet by 135 feet, and larger in other parts of the development.

Brown said 29 acres of the property will be designated as open space.

One point of contention throughout the presentation was over the town’s skyline restrictions.

Vargish said the 25 lots in the Ridge at Crystal Valley portion of the planned development sit partially within a designated Moderate Skyline Area. For these 25 lots the applicant requested a Skyline Variance to increase the maximum permitted height of the homes from 25 feet to 35 feet.

To support the variance request, Vargish said a Skyline study was performed. The study analyzed all 25 lots and whether a 25-foot-high structure, if built upon the lots, would be visible in the skyline from each of the 232 viewing platforms. The study used proposed finished grades for all 25 lots. The study found that homes 25 feet in height built upon the lots would not be visible in the skyline from a large majority of viewing platforms, requiring a variance.

In voting against the plan, Councilmember Caryn Johnson said the skyline restrictions are in place for a reason and she did not want to set a precedent for other developers. Councilmember Laura Cavey also voted against the measure.

In other business, the council unanimously voted to move forward with the Downtown Historic Preservation Grant program. Vargish said the program was approved last year, with $50,000 in funding budgeted for 2021.

The Downtown Historic Preservation Grant program provides monetary assistance for rehabilitation and restoration of historic properties within downtown. The grants are available for 50% of the project cost or up to $25,000. Two rounds of applications were conducted in 2021. One round received no applications, and the second round received one application.

Town council awarded a $25,000 grant to the Douglas Masonic Temple Association building, 300 N. Wilcox St. The owners were asking for assistance with window and door restoration costs. The Douglas Masonic Temple, formerly known as the First National Bank of Douglas County, is on the National Register of Historic Places and is locally landmarked.

Vargish said there is oversight in the program, noting that funds are only paid through reimbursements once the restoration work is complete.

Comments

Our Papers

Ad blocker detected

We have noticed you are using an ad blocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we receive from our advertisers helps make this site possible. We request you whitelist our site.