Letter to the editor

Posted 3/14/21

Questions about equity policy Douglas County residents agree that all kids should thrive in school. To help accomplish this, we should foster respect and empathy and reject bias and racism. This is …

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Letter to the editor

Posted

Questions about equity policy

Douglas County residents agree that all kids should thrive in school. To help accomplish this, we should foster respect and empathy and reject bias and racism. This is an important goal of DCSD’s proposed educational equity policy.

But many parents are concerned with some of the ways the policy proposes to achieve these shared goals.

The policy seems to spotlight children’s differences. That characteristics like skin color and gender define their identity, and their identity influences what they’re currently capable of achieving.

Is putting the focus on our differences, instead of shared dignity and capabilities, how to encourage harmony and prepare children for life?

Disturbingly, the policy says the district won’t condone “meritocracy” — calling the belief we can achieve our goals through hard work and talent, a “myth.” What impact does it have to tell kids they don’t have self-determination? How to explain the countless examples, across demographics, where hard work has produced success? How are teachers supposed to help students flourish?

Would “equity” mean “equality of result,” which requires treating people unequally and discourages kids from reaching their potential?

How would curriculum and regulations change and how would they prepare all kids for a successful life?

Sadly, kids are experiencing increasing anxiety and depression. But research shows that if they’re taught resiliency and self-determination, this can lead to greater happiness and success in school.

But by focusing on group differences and teaching that self-determination is a “myth,” I’m concerned the proposed educational equity policy won’t help children flourish individually or together.

You can provide feedback on this policy till March 23 at DCSDk12.org.

Will Johnson

Highlands Ranch

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